ARTICLES Archives - Page 2 of 4 - PAYE
94
archive,paged,category,category-articles,category-94,paged-2,category-paged-2,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1400,footer_responsive_adv,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,qode-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,qode-theme-ver-17.2,qode-theme-bridge,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.6,vc_responsive
 

ARTICLES

In essence ‘Hot-Lime’ refers to a mortar mix being produced using quick lime within the mix, rather than it being slaked first before being mixed with aggregates. Lime is produced by first burning chalk or limestone (CaC03) to form quick lime (Calcium Oxide – CaO)....

PAYE Conservation have recently completed laser cleaning trials with the assistance of Dr Martin Cooper of Lynton Lasers to two differing projects with great success, these being St Georges Cathedral, Southwark and The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square....

Pevensey Castle is an impressive ruin which stands on high ground. This naturally defensible site was first fortified by the Romans and was most famously the place where the Norman Conquest of England began, when William the Conqueror landed there in 1066....

The neoclassical architecture found in St Martin’s Place is collectively known as the ‘St Martins Parochial Buildings’ and are grade II* listed. More informally they are referred to as The North Range on Church Path. They comprise The Vicarage (No.6 St Martin’s Place), Vestry Hall...

The methods and materials identified below form part of the armoury used in the conservation cleaning of historic objects. This could be, but is not exclusive to, polished stonework including fireplaces, sculpture and monuments....

Mathematical tiles or ‘tyles’ are a building material used extensively in the South Eastern counties of England during the 18th and early 19th Centuries. They can come in a variety of forms, from slate, to fired brick-like tiles, through to Terracotta. Although the brick tax...

The Church of St Alfege, Greenwich is a Grade I listed building from the early 18th Century. It was designed by eminent architect Nicholas Hawksmoor and is perhaps one of the most iconic churches in London. Hawksmoor studied under Sir Christopher Wren, and St Alfege’s...

Holborn Bars is a Grade II* listed building in the borough of Camden on the boundary of the City of London. Construction started in 1878 under architect Alfred Waterhouse and was then modified thereafter in phases by his son Paul Waterhouse, being finally completed in...

PAYE are proud to announce that they are key sponsors of this year’s CIOB Conference entitled ‘Conservation, Adaptation & Maintenance of The Built Environment’. The event is being held on the 30th April 2019 at Church House, located in the World Heritage site of Westminster...

Kentish ragstone is a hard, medium grey limestone quarried in the county of Kent in South-East England. It is drawn from the geological formation known as the Hythe Formation of the Lower Greensand Group, laid down in the Cretaceous period. Ragstone generally occurs in bands...